Course

The Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Minorities

This course addresses the human rights of indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities, taking up contemporary tensions such as religious, social and political conditions, tensions between national sovereignty and collective and individual rights, as well as questions of identity. Significant emphasis is placed on the arguments that have been asserted by actual minority groups on these issues.

At the end of the course, the student is expected to:

  • show a good understanding of how indigenous rights, as well as the rights of ethnic and national minorities, are defined in international law
  • show a basic understanding of the theoretical framework that defines how these rights relate to the nation-state and to democracy
  • demonstrate independent thinking and competence in undertaking research on indigenous peoples’ relationship to majority populations and cultural frameworks.

Anaya, S. James, 2004. Indigenous Peoples in International Law, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press. (200 pp)

Bodley, John H., 2015. Victims of Progress. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield (395 pp). Also available as e-book via EbscoHost for students at University College Stockholm.

Articles

Anaya, S. James (2009) “The Right of Indigenous Peoples to Self-Determination in the Post-Declaration Era”. In, C. Charters & R. Stavenhagen (eds.). Making the Declaration Work: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Copenhagen: IWGIA, Document No. 127, pp. 184-199 (15 pp.). Avaliable at: Link

Asch, Michael and Samson, Colin, et al., 2004. “Dialogue on the Return of the Native”. Current Anthropology, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 261-267 (7 pp).

Bowen, John R., 2000. ”Should We have a universal concept of indigenous peoples’ rights?. Anthropology Today, vol. 16, No. 4 pp. 12-16 (5 pp). Available at JSTOR. Note that this requires that you create an account at JSTOR.

Engle, Karen, 2011. On Fragile Architecture: The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Context of Human Rights (23 pp) European Journal of International Law, vol. 22, No. 1, pp.141-163. Available at www.ejil.org/search.php

Johansson Dahre, Ulf, 2008. The Politics of Human Rights: Indigenous Peoples and the Conflict on Collective Human Rights”, The International Journal of Human Rights, (2008) vol. 12 , no 1, pp. 41-52. (12 pp)

Kenrick, Justin & Lewis, Jerome, 2004. “Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and the Politics of the Term Indigenous”. Anthropology Today, vol.20, no 2, s 4-9 (6 pp). Available at JSTOR. Note that this requires that you create an account at JSTOR.

Kipuri, Naomi (2009) “The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the African Context”. ”. In, C. Charters & R. Stavenhagen (eds.). Making the Declaration Work: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Copenhagen: IWGIA, Document No. 127, pp.252-263 (11 pp.). Avaliable at: Link

Kuper, Adam, 2003. “The Return of the Native”. Current Anthropology, vol 44, No. 3, pp. 388-402. (15 pp)

Niezen, Ronald (2003) “The Origins of the International Movement of Indigenous Peoples”. In, R. Niezen, The Origins of Indigenism: Human Rights and the Politics of Identity. Berkely: University of California Press, pp. 29-52 (23 pp.). Also available as e-book via EbscoHost.

Roy, Chandra K (2009). “Indigenous Peoples in Asia: Rights and Development Challenges”. In, C. Charters & R. Stavenhagen (eds.). Making the Declaration Work: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Copenhagen: IWGIA, Document No. 127, pp.216-231 (15 pp.). Avaliable at: Link

Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina (2017) “Exploring extractive violence on indigenous country”. Umeå University: Centre for Sami Studies, pp. 33-42 (9 pp.). Available at www.diva-portal.org

Totten, Samuel, William S. Parson & Robert K. Hitchcock (2002) “Confronting Genocide and Ethnocide of Indigenous Peoples: An InterdisciplinarynApproach to Definition, Intervention, Prevention and Advocacy”. In. A.L. Hinton (ed.) Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide. Berkeley: University of California Press, pp. 54-91 (37 pp.). Also available as e-book via EbscoHost.

Reference Literature

IWGIA (2020) The Indigenous World. Copenhagen: IWGIA (784 pages)

Johansson Dahre, Ulf (2020, 2:a uppl.) The International Discourse on Indigenous Peoples: A Compilation of Legal and Political Texts. Lund: Palmkrons förlag (560 pages)

Additional legal cases: 100 pages


Literature last revised on October 5, 2020.

The schedule is available at the latest one month before the course starts. We do not recommend that you print the schedule as some changes may happen.

Open the Schedule

Ulf Johansson Dahre

PhD, Docent

ulf.johansson-dahre@ehs.se

Grades

A = Excellent, B = Very good, C = Good, D = Satisfactory, E = Sufficient, Fx = Insufficient, F = Insufficient

Examination Format

  • Papers
  • Take-home examination

Grundläggande behörighet.

Completion of a course requires a minimum of 80% attendance at lectures and 100% attendance at seminars/group work and other assignments. Absence beyond that can be compensated by supplementing assignment(s) if the instructor finds it possible. In case of an absence of 50% or more, the course is considered as interrupted, even if assignments have been completed.

If a student due to disability has a decision from the EHS on special pedagogical support, the examiner shall, if necessary, adapt the examination and conduct the examination in an alternative way.

Established by The College of Human Rights at Enskilda Högskolan Stockholm on December 8, 2014.

Last revised on January 20, 2020.