Eastern Christian Studies

Eastern Christian Studies

Eastern Christian Studies investigates how Eastern Christianity defined itself in relation to the Jewish and Greco-Roman religious, philosophical, rhetorical, social, and cultural heritages in the Early Church, and how the later Eastern Christianity defined itself in the various contexts of history. This includes attention to the reception, appropriation, and transformation of Classical and Jewish thought-systems and ways of life, as well as later world-views that the various Eastern Churches adopted on its way to the present. Related important areas of research are the exploration of the processes associated with the reception of Sacred Scripture, and Christianity’s growing power in the Early Church, and the problems inherent with the rise of the Christian Empires, the impact of the Islamic world and later nationalism. Eastern Christian Studies explores the content of the various Eastern traditions from a biblical perspective, patristic perspective, liturgical perspective and an ecclesiological perspective with a variety of scholarly methods.

Eastern Christian Studies at Stockholm School of Theology has a broad horizon with a variety of perspectives and methods. Among the prominent features are the Early Church, Monastic life and thoughts, the use of the Bible in Liturgy, Arabic Christianity (especially the encounter with Islam and the Quran), International Relations and Orthodox Unity, Public Ecclesiology and Systematic Ecclesiology, and the function of the Liturgy. We also cover a variety of traditions such as Western and Eastern Syriac traditions, Ethio- Eritrean traditions, Coptic tradition, and Byzantine traditions (both Greek and Slavic). A common understanding among our scholars is the use of critique as a mechanism of progression. In Biblical and Patristic perspectives, historical-critical methods are employed to unravel the past in relation to its historical context, so history opens to the future. In Liturgical and Ecclesiological perspectives, a variety of methods are used to interpret and understand the present conditions of the Church as a juxtaposition between history and the socio-cultural position of the Church.

 

Teachers, Scholars and Doctoral Students

Polycarpus Augin Aydin, visiting Senior Lecturer
Bar-Sawme, Gabriel, Doctoral Student & visiting Lecturer
Gobena, Abate, Doctoral Student
Hayati, Said, Doctoral Student
Hjälm, Michael, Senior Lecturer
Hovorun, Cyril, Senior Lecturer
Kitchen, Robert, Senior Lecturer
Lindgren Hjälm, Mirjam, Senior Lecturer
Rubenson, Samuel, Professor